Doodle Quilting: Over 120 Continuous-Line Machine-Quilting Designs

June 22, 2013 - Comment

Cheryl Malkowsi makes it easy to free-motion quilt by mastering your doodling skills! In her beginner’s guide to continuous-line quilting designs, learn how to select the right shapes to get where you need to go; sometimes the hardest part is figuring out where to quilt next. Squiggles, swirls, flowers, feathers…learn which are best for confined

Cheryl Malkowsi makes it easy to free-motion quilt by mastering your doodling skills! In her beginner’s guide to continuous-line quilting designs, learn how to select the right shapes to get where you need to go; sometimes the hardest part is figuring out where to quilt next. Squiggles, swirls, flowers, feathers…learn which are best for confined spaces and which work better traveling across your quilt. Gain confidence in your ability to draw basic shapes, then learn how to put them together into over a hundred all-over quilting designs. Includes drawing exercises and tips for transferring designs from paper to fabric.

Product Features

  • CT-56362
  • 9781607056362
  • Brand New Item / Unopened Product
  • C&T Publishing

Comments

S. L. Smith "SansSerif" says:

One-stop Beginner/Intermediate Quilting Resource for Right-Brainers AND Left-Brainers Doodle Quilting has no photos of finished samples except for the cover and 3 or 4 pages of doodle ensembles inside the book; it is 99% black-and-white line drawings with supplemental text. So why would I rate it 5 out of 5 stars? And what sets Cheryl Malkowski’s new book Doodle Quilting apart from all the other free-form quilting books out there?Words.And this is a welcome addition for quilters like me who are left-brainers who benefit from being TOLD – not just SHOWN – how to do something. I like that each drawing has a “think” subtitle, giving the quilter a type of mantra to murmur (or mutter, that happens too) as the fabric (or long-arm) is moved. Some of these are not super-sophisticated (“spiral in, spiral out”), but this verbiage can help unlock those frozen arms or help a newbie break out of the basic meander mode.Right-brain (or visual) quilters will most certainly pick up a few tips and flourishes from the many black-and-white line…

Linda Duvaul says:

Where do I Stitch Next?! Doodle Quilting is the best guide for free motion quilting I have ever seen! As a retired teacher I am wildly impressed with Cheryl’s teaching skills. She takes the novice from tracing, pen in hand, to a two handed assimulation of the quilting motions needed.Easy and memorable vocabulary, (Sunshines & Spikeys,) is used to help the learner remember new ideas.Easy and memorable catagories, (Travelers & Boomerangs,) are used to help the learner store and retrieve these new ideas.Most impressive is her “Think” prompts under each pattern. (The simple leaf, “Think” –in and back– make a football.) This technique allows both the right and left brain to work together, which makes successful quilting very likely.For the experienced quilter she easily addresses the hardest part of free motion quilting, deciding where you are going to stitch next.This is a Five Star, must have quilting guide.

Carol Bledsoe says:

Exactly what I was looking for I have two quilts that need to be quilted. I came across this book on a Blog that I follow. I ordered it immediately. I use my Pfaff sewing machine for all of my quilting, not a longarm. I like the idea of tracing and then drawing out the designs. I found that by the time I was ready to practice on fabric, it was a very easy transition and didn’t require as much practice there as I expected. I used my variation on one of the designs in the book to quilt the sashing in one of my quilts. It was easy and turned out exactly the way I envisioned. I would definitely recommend this book. It has great ideas for background and filler designs.

Write a comment

*